mariahy

Think About Office Design

What makes a good office chair? This is probably not something you think about a lot, despite the fact that you probably spend a whole lot of time sitting in one throughout your workday. On the Spine-Health website (www.spine-health.com), they list the following as the important criteria for choosing a proper egonomic chair: seat height, seat width and depth, lumbar support, back rest, seat material, armrests, swivel.

I spoke with a few office workers to see which of these criteria they found important in an office chair.

It comes to no surprise that most of their answers were similar.

Dave works for a travel agency in Santa Clarita, CA. He spends a good 6-8 hours of his workday in an office chair.

George works for a studio in Burbank, CA. He spends more than half of his workday in a chair.

Ali works in Covina. He doesn't spend as much time in an office chair as the other two folks I interviewed, but his next job could see that time increase significantly.

Dave commented that the things he looks for in a chair are "Comfort. Good back support, the right amount of room, adjustable height, with sturdy armrests at a comfortable height. And no leather, please!"

Both Dave and Ali agreed that a breathable fabric was much more desirable than the inherent sexiness of leather on an office chair.

Dave said, "I'm not a fan of leather. office furniture nyc I prefer something made with breathable fabric. Good breathable fabric doesn't get too hot and is soft without being slippery."

Ali admitted to being a fan of leather, "But if I'm going to sit on it for hours, I'd much rather have something with breathable fabric."

George spends most of his day on an Aeron chair. Interestingly enough, George had this to say about the fabled dot.com Aeron chair, "I can't stand the stretchy web material they're made of. After sitting in them for a little while, the chair starts hurting my back." "I look for one of our few old-fashioned foam and cushion chairs, and find that I prefer those in the long run." "I definitely prefer any other material over leather. Leather gets too cold in the winter."

No chair is setup perfectly out of the box, and all three interviewees agreed that adjustability was a huge plus in the chair stakes.

Dave insisted on maximum adjustability. "I have chronic neck and back problems, so I need to make sure that my chair can be configured to mitigate that discomfort."

George notes that, "As I get older, my back gets out of whack very easily so having a chair that fits well has gotten more and more important but ultimately price makes a difference."

The three of them agreed that $300 is about as much as they would spend on an office chair. The Aeron Chair I mentioned earlier retails anywhere from $500-$700 US.